Stress Concentration Factors for Mechanical Design

Ever J. Barbero , West Virginia University

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Rectangular bar with center hole subjected to axial load

Rectangular bar with center hole subjected to axial load
 Rectangular bar with symmetric edge notches, axial load

Rectangular bar with symmetric edge notches, axial load
Rectangular bar with center hole subjected to out-of-plane bending

Rectangular bar with center hole subjected to out-of-plane bending
Rectangular bar with symmetric edge notches, in-plane bending

Rectangular bar with symmetric edge notches, in-plane bending
Notched circular shaft subjected to axial load

Notched circular shaft subjected to axial load
Rectangular bar with symmetric fillet, axial load

Rectangular bar with symmetric fillet, axial load
Notched circular shaft subjected to bending

Notched circular shaft subjected to bending
Rectangular bar with symmetric fillet, axial load

Rectangular bar with symmetric fillet, in-plane bending moment
Notched circular shaft subjected to torque

Notched circular shaft subjected to torque
Rectangular bar with symmetric fillet, axial load

Circular shaft with fillet subjected to axial load
Circular shaft with fillet subjected to bending

Circular shaft with fillet subjected to bending
Circular shaft with fillet subjected to torque

Circular shaft with fillet subjected to torque
   
   
   
   

You could use the stress concentration factors (SCF) in Shigley's [1], which are taken from Peterson's work published in 1951 [p. 1035,1]. They are pretty good considering that in 1951 they had no computers and of course no Finite Element Analisys (FEA). The SCF response surfaces embedded in this site were developed using state-of-the-art Abaqus software (2017) and state-of-the-art FEA techniques such as adaptive meshing, error estimation, and so on [2]. You could reproduce the results reported in this site, by yourself, using any FEA package, such as ANSYS [3]. Additional sources are cited in other pages on this site. 

[1] Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design , ISBN-13: 978-0073398204
[2] Introduction to Composite Materials Design Using Abaqus
[3] Introduction to Composite Materials Design Using ANSYS